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$0 EXTRA FEE EYE EXAMS FOR SENIORS AGE 65 AND OVER
 Although seniors often take a lot more time to exam,and require more testing, your fee will not increase.

 YOU NEED:

  • Comprehensive eye exams every year;
  • Advanced diagnostic testing
  • Eye emergency access
  • Eye Doctors 100% dedicated to your needs.

WE PROVIDE

  • NO EXTRA FEE eye exams for seniors;
  • Accurate diagnosis at time of exam
  • Same day clinic access in eye emergencies
  • Eye care and eye doctors 6 days a week.

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Senior Eye Health Exams

The premise is we all want health eyes to enjoy our senior years . Our eyes are what drives us though out the day and its important to take care of our aging eyes.

First Get A Comprehensive Eye Exam.

Everyone age 50 or older needs a comprehensive eye exam Many eye diseases have no early warning signs or symptoms, but a Spectrum comprehensive exam can detect eye diseases in their early stages before vision loss occurs. Early detection and treatment can help you save your sight. Even if you aren’t experiencing any vision problems, visit us for a comprehensive eye exam and we will tell you how often you need to have one depending on your specific risk factors.

At a time when you might not make appointments as frequently, seniors need regular eye exams more than anyone else. Yearly eye exams
become much more important as we age. Eye problems can strike at any age as seniors are more likely to suffer from glaucoma, cataracts, or macular degeneration than any other age group. Increased disease risk in addition to the constant problem of changing eyesight makes it crucial for seniors to schedule an eye examination yearly once they reach the age of 60.

Just as our physical strength decreases with age, our eyes also exhibit an age-related decline in performance particularly as we reach our 60s and beyond. That's why The Spectrum Eye Centre gives special attention to seniors. We provide a thorough eye exam tailored for your needs. 

  • When Do Age Related Vision Changes Occur?
    Presbyopia. After you pass the milestone age of 40, you'll notice it's more difficult to focus on objects up close. This normal loss of focusing ability is called presbyopia, and is due to hardening of the lens inside your eye.
    For a time, you can compensate for this decline in focusing ability by just holding reading material farther away from your eyes. But eventually, you'll need reading glasses, multifocal contact lenses or multifocal eyeglasses. Some corrective surgery options for presbyopia also are available, such as monovision LASIK and conductive keratoplasty (CK).
    Cataracts. Even though cataracts are considered an age-related eye disease, they are so common among seniors that they can also be classified as a normal aging change. According to Mayo Clinic, about half of all 65-year-old North Americans have some degree of cataract formation in their eyes. As you enter your 70s, the percentage is even higher!
    Thankfully, modern cataract surgery is extremely safe and so effective that 100% of vision lost to cataract formation usually is restored. If you are noticing vision changes due to cataracts, don't hesitate to discuss symptoms with us
    It's often better to have cataracts removed before they advance too far. Also, multifocal lens implants are now available. These advanced intraocular lenses (IOLs) potentially can restore all ranges of vision, thus reducing your need for reading glasses as well as distance glasses after cataract surgery.
  • Major Age Related Eye Disease
    Macular degeneration. Macular degeneration (also called age-related macular degeneration or AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among Canadian seniors. Currently, there is no cure for AMD, but medical treatment may slow its progression or stabilize it.
    Glaucoma. Your risk of developing glaucoma increases with each decade after age 40 – from around 1% in your 40s to up to 12% in your 80s. The number of Canadians with glaucoma is expected to increase by 50% (to 360,000) by the year 2020. If detected early enough, glaucoma can often be controlled with medical treatment or surgery and vision loss can be prevented.
    Diabetic retinopathy. Over 1 million Canadians over age 40 are known to have diabetes. Many experts believe that up to 30% of people who have diabetes have not yet been diagnosed. Among known diabetics over age 40, it is estimates that 40% have some degree of diabetic retinopathy, and one of every 12 people with diabetes in this age group has advanced, vision-threatening retinopathy. Controlling the underlying diabetic condition in its early stages is the key to preventing vision loss.
  • How Aging Affects Other Eye Structures
    While normally we think of aging as it relates to conditions such as presbyopia and cataracts, more subtle changes in our vision and eye structures also take place as we grow older. These changes include:
    • Reduced pupil size. As we age, muscles that control our pupil size and reaction to light lose some strength. This causes the pupil to become smaller and less responsive to changes in ambient lighting. Because of these changes, people in their 60s need three times more ambient light for comfortable reading than those in their 20s. Also, seniors are more likely to be dazzled by bright sunlight and glare when emerging from a dimly lit building such as a movie theater. Eyeglasses with photochromic lenses and anti-reflective coating can help reduce this problem.
    • Dry eyes. As we age, our bodies produce fewer tears. This is particularly true for women after menopause. If you begin to experience burning, stinging or other eye discomfort related to dry eyes, our doctors are part of The Dry Eye Clinic of Regina are are trained to asses your dry eye to reverse and provide relief throughout the day for comfort,

    • Loss of peripheral vision. Aging also causes a normal loss of peripheral vision, with the size of our visual field decreasing by approximately one to three degrees per decade of life. By the time you reach your 70s and 80s, you may have a peripheral visual field loss of 20 to 30 degrees. Because the loss of visual field increases the risk for automobile accidents, make sure you are more cautious when driving. To increase your range of vision, turn your head and look both ways when approaching intersections.

    • Decreased color vision. Cells in the retina that are responsible for normal color vision decline in sensitivity as we age, causing colors to become less bright and the contrast between different colors to be less noticeable. In particular, blue colors may appear faded or "washed out." While there is no treatment for this normal, age-related loss of color perception, you should be aware of this loss if your profession (for example, artist, seamstress or electrician) requires fine color discrimination.

    • Vitreous detachment. As we age, the gel-like vitreous inside the eye begins to liquefy and pull away from the retina, causing "spots and floaters" and (sometimes) flashes of light. This condition, called vitreous detachment, is usually harmless. But floaters and flashes of light can also signal the beginning of a retinal detachment – a serious problem that can cause blindness if not treated immediately. If you experience flashes and floaters, see your eye doctor immediately to determine the cause.
  • What You Can Do About Age-Related Vision Changes
    A healthy diet and wise lifestyle choices – including exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, reducing stress and not smoking – are your best natural defences against vision loss as you age. Also, have regular eye exams with to catch conditions in an early stage.
    Be sure to discuss with your eye doctor all concerns you have about your eyes and vision. Tell them about any history of eye problems in your family and any health problems you may have. Also, let your eye doctor know about any medications you take, including non-prescription vitamins, herbs and supplements.
    To help you we have provided an online secure form that form that you may bring to your appointment or submit directly on line
    Lutein Dietary Supplements

    Dietary supplements of lutein can complement your intake of food nutrients to effectively allow enough daily intake.
    Lutein may be found in the following types of products available at many health food stores, pharmacies, and grocery stores:
    • Eyecare Formulas.  These products feature a number of nutrients that protect vision.  Products may include 6 milligrams of lutein or more. Examples are Systane Vitamins , Vitalux Ocuvite (Preservision) and ICaps,

    • Multivitamin Formulas.  Check the label to see if lutein is included.  Todays vitamin supplements ususally include lutein.  An example is Centrum Silver.

    • SingleNutrient.  Some products contain only lutein, 6 milligrams or more.

    • Look for supplements that are a purified source of lutein. This helps to ensure both quality and bioavailability.
  • Vitamins For Healthy Eyes
    Good Vision Starts Here

    A growing body of evidence suggests that certain vitamins and minerals may curb the biochemical events underlying cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). The research has shown that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables along with vitamin supplements may enhance the body's defenses against cell damaging free radicals.

    Good Vision Involves Vitamin Therapy

    Numerous laboratory and clinical studies have shown a link between vitamin and mineral deficiency and cataracts. Likewise, studies have found a reduced risk of cataracts in patients with high dietary intake of vitamins A, C, D, E, riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, iron and folic acid. The links between nutrition and degenerative disease suggest that vitamin and mineral deficiency may be associated with retinal degeneration and that supplements of these nutrients may play a protective role.

    Tips For Good Vision

    1 Avoid sun gazing, and wear ultra violet blocking sun glasses at all times in brilliant sun light.
    2 Do not smoke, and avoid secondary smoke. If you smoke or drink, plan on taking in extra vitamin A, because tobacco keeps your body from absorbing it and drinking depletes what you already have in your body.
    3 Maintain a balanced diet including fresh fruits, vegetables and grains. Cooking can change the values, as heat will destroy vitamin A and beta-carotene in foods. Also, if you don't pick up fresh food, select frozen rather than canned, as canning strips away much more of the vitamin A in food.
    4 Consider antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplementation. If you smoke, drink or have diabetes, you should try to take in extra vitamin C, because your levels will tend to be lower than average.
    5 Light is also destructive to C, so if you drink orange juice, it's better to purchase it in opaque plastic jugs or cartons, rather than in glass bottles. Like vitamin A, foods with C are better fresh than frozen or canned, as either process could deplete the amount of the vitamin.
    6 Remember that all antioxidants are good for your body, including your eyes, but vitamins A, C and E and lutein are the most helpful to your eyes.


    Recommended Foods For Good Vision

    VITAMIN WHERE TO FIND IT WHAT IT DOES LACK OF CAUSES
    A Liver, Egg yolk, Fish oil, Kidney, Milk fat, Dark green fruits and vegetables .Other products are cod liver oil, beef, chicken, carrots,sweet patotoe,mango and Cantaloupe Prevents night blindness. Maintains night vision. Essential for day-to-day vision.Vitamin A also prevents cataracts from forming and may have a role in preventing blindness from macular degeneration.
    Can lead to xerophthalmia, with dryness in the eyes, corneal ulcers and swollen eyelids.
    B1 (thiamin) Pork, Liver, Whole-grain and enriched cereals and breads, Legumes, Potatoes, Wheat germ Studies have shown that people who take thiamin are less likely to get cataracts.
    B2 (riboflavin) Green vegetables, Liver, Wheat germ, Eggs, Cheese
    Alleviates eye fatigue.
    C Tomatoes, Fruits (especially citrus), Melon, Raw cabbage, Green leafy vegetables, Peppers
    Nutrients C, E and zinc oxide are antioxidants, which prevent lens deterioration. More recently has shown to reduce risk of glaucoma
    E Wheat germ, Vegetable oils, Egg yolk, Milk fat, Green leafy vegetables, Nuts are an excellent source
    Nutrients C, E and zinc oxide are antioxidants, which prevent lens deterioration.
    Rapid cataracts, and more likely hood of developing macular degeneration.
    Lutein and Zeaxanthin Green leaves of spinach, Kale, Collards, Mustard greens, Amaranth, Spirulina, Marigold flower petals, Red paprika Protects the eyes from sun damage. Particularly helpful for people with blue, green or hazel-colored eyes.
    Increase risk of developing macular degeneration and cataracts.
    Zinc Oxide Oysters, Shellfish, Eggs, Legumes, Herring, Liver, Milk Nutrients C, E and zinc oxide are antioxidants, which prevent lens deterioration.
  • Protect Your Eye Sight With Lutein
    Being eye smart at a young age can play big dividends in later life.  Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness among North Americans age 65 and older.  A natural antioxidant, lutein can play a role in maintaining healthy eyes in such situations.

    Leading research intuitions suggest a daily intake of lutein to help ward off age related degeneration that may occur at the retinal level.

    Most individuals are surprised to learn they can promote healthy vision before they reach 60 years of age.

    What is Lutein

    Lutein is a carotenoid which is found in many fruits and vegetables.
    Lutein acts as an antioxidant, protecting cells against the damaging effects of free radicals.
    Free radicals are molecules that are missing an electron.  As such these free radicals are more reactive and seek to "steal" an electron from a neighboring molecule.  They can create a breakdown in cell structure.  Antioxidants are able to share an electron and neutralize the reactive behavior of such molecule.  Lutein is found at the retinal level and in particular the macula were vision first starts.

    Lutein is not made in the body and must be obtained from food or vitamin supplements.  Green leafy vegetables such as spinach contain large amounts of lutein.

    Lutein, Vision and Eyes

    Studies show that lutein and zeaxanthin are the predominant antioxidants found in the macula.  The macula is in the center of the retina, where light is first received.  Millions of photoreceptor cells laying in a flat bed help produce sharp vision which is needed to read and see objects clearly.

    Retinal specialists believe that macular pigment protects the retina and as such has been used to measure the health of the eye.  Deeper density of pigment is thought to produce safer levels of eye health.
    Several factors can reduce pigment density such as, sun UV exposure, smoking, and alcohol comsumption.

    Dietary intake of lutein increases pigment density and helps filter out the blue light spectrum therefore reducing the damage caused by free radical damage.

    Lutein In Your Diet

    Nutrition experts agree that one should use 6 milligrams a day as a reliable guideline. This is equivalent to a large bowl of spinach salad.  These foods provide high levels of lutein every time you eat a spinach salad or a serving of kale or turnip greens.
    Persons who eat large amounts of fruits and vegetables have reduced risk of age-related macular degeneration by 43 percent.

    Are you wanting to know how much lutein is in various foods?  We have compiled a chart below per 8 oz serving.  The recommended weekly intake is 42mg.
    Leaf Lettuce 
    1.8mg

    Broccoli 1.9mg
    Tomatoes  0.1mg
    Green Peas  1.7mg
    Raw Carrot  0.26mg
    Collard Greens 16.3mg
    Corn  0.78mg
    Raw Spinach  10.mg
    Green Beans  0.74mg
    Brussel Sprouts 1.3mg
    Kale  21.9
    Lutein Dietary Supplements

    Dietary supplements of lutein can complement your intake of food nutrients to effectively allow enough daily intake.
    Lutein may be found in the following types of products available at many health food stores, pharmacies, and grocery stores:
    • Eyecare Formulas.  These products feature a number of nutrients that protect vision.  Products may include 6 milligrams of lutein or more. Examples are Systane Vitamins , Vitalux Ocuvite (Preservision) and ICaps,

    • Multivitamin Formulas.  Check the label to see if lutein is included.  Todays vitamin supplements ususally include lutein.  An example is Centrum Silver.

    • SingleNutrient.  Some products contain only lutein, 6 milligrams or more.

    • Look for supplements that are a purified source of lutein. This helps to ensure both quality and bioavailability.
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